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Minding The Gap: How Your Company Can Woo Female Coders
The software industry has a gender problem. Men far outnumber women, and while most of those men like (dare we say delight in?) having women around the office, the cool-bro rockstar nerd culture makes it harder to attract, hire, retain and—most importantly—listen to women engineers.

 We’ll be tracking successes, conflicts, and visionaries in this vein, and narrate as the status quo changes. 

Our promise: We won’t stop tracking this story until there are as many women working in software as men.
Here are some updates:
For those who missed it, “donglegate,” as Wired dubbed it, is the latest blowup after a display of sexism in the coding community.
Bruce Byfield, who has written extensively on all things free & open source, gives an overview of sexism in the FOSS community. 
Ashe Dryden, a Drupal and Rails developer, did the software community a huge favor by starting to answer the question “How can I help tech be less sexist?” 
The headline of this article in Forbes elides individual (and organizational) responsibility by saying that women are “accidentally” excluded from tech. 
Dani Landers, a transgender woman game developer, gives an account of how her identity informs her game design decisionsin Bloom, a game currently vying for funding on Kickstarter.
So, a pretty prime example of women being reduced to sexual objects in the technology world is this article on Complex, “The 40 Hottest Women in Tech”. 
Stay tuned as coverage continues!
[Image: Flickr user Ryan Anger]

Minding The Gap: How Your Company Can Woo Female Coders

The software industry has a gender problem. Men far outnumber women, and while most of those men like (dare we say delight in?) having women around the office, the cool-bro rockstar nerd culture makes it harder to attract, hire, retain and—most importantly—listen to women engineers.

We’ll be tracking successes, conflicts, and visionaries in this vein, and narrate as the status quo changes.

Our promise: We won’t stop tracking this story until there are as many women working in software as men.

Here are some updates:

For those who missed it, “donglegate,” as Wired dubbed it, is the latest blowup after a display of sexism in the coding community.

Bruce Byfield, who has written extensively on all things free & open source, gives an overview of sexism in the FOSS community. 

Ashe Dryden, a Drupal and Rails developer, did the software community a huge favor by starting to answer the question “How can I help tech be less sexist?” 

The headline of this article in Forbes elides individual (and organizational) responsibility by saying that women are “accidentally” excluded from tech. 

Dani Landers, a transgender woman game developer, gives an account of how her identity informs her game design decisionsin Bloom, a game currently vying for funding on Kickstarter.

So, a pretty prime example of women being reduced to sexual objects in the technology world is this article on Complex, “The 40 Hottest Women in Tech”. 

Stay tuned as coverage continues!

[Image: Flickr user Ryan Anger]