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What’s The Secret To Design Innovation? Extreme Immersion
Legendary design researcher Jan Chipchase shares his strategy for looking for the next big thing in a foreign land. 
There’s a particular type of traveler that many of us know: the tourist who never strays from the well-worn path of landmarks and tourist traps, who only sees the side of another culture that has been handpicked for people like him, and returns home with a very predictable—and incomplete—experience. Then there are those who like to explore, to get lost on purpose and let the unexpected find them. Unlike the first form of travel, those who allow themselves to get lost in the new environment have fewer guarantees and a greater risk of disappointment (and mugging), but there is also an infinitely greater chance of new and unique experiences that will prompt new ideas and points of view.

Rather than corporate hotels, I try to have our team stay together in a house: usually a rental property, but occasionally with a host family. It’s cheaper than a hotel, we get to embed ourselves in the culture, and it brings the team closer together.

Read the full story here.

What’s The Secret To Design Innovation? Extreme Immersion

Legendary design researcher Jan Chipchase shares his strategy for looking for the next big thing in a foreign land. 

There’s a particular type of traveler that many of us know: the tourist who never strays from the well-worn path of landmarks and tourist traps, who only sees the side of another culture that has been handpicked for people like him, and returns home with a very predictable—and incomplete—experience. Then there are those who like to explore, to get lost on purpose and let the unexpected find them. Unlike the first form of travel, those who allow themselves to get lost in the new environment have fewer guarantees and a greater risk of disappointment (and mugging), but there is also an infinitely greater chance of new and unique experiences that will prompt new ideas and points of view.

Rather than corporate hotels, I try to have our team stay together in a house: usually a rental property, but occasionally with a host family. It’s cheaper than a hotel, we get to embed ourselves in the culture, and it brings the team closer together.

Read the full story here.