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4 Things You Didn’t Know About Chuck Jones, Brilliant Creator Of Road Runner And Wile E. Coyote
Most six-year-olds addicted to Saturday morning cartoons don’t know much about the man behind beloved characters like Wile E. Coyote and Roadrunner, or about the painstaking work that went into making Bugs Bunny chomp carrots and say “What’s Up, Doc?” For three decades, animation director and artist Charles Martin “Chuck” Jones was the mastermind behind these mania-filled classic cartoons. The Animation Art of Chuck Jones, a new exhibit at New York’s Museum of the Moving Image, celebrates his creative genius. It features 23 of the 300 animated films he directed, including How the Grinch Stole Christmas, as well as 125 original sketches, storyboards, animation cels, and photographs. Here, four things you probably didn’t know about Jones, who died in 2002:
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4 Things You Didn’t Know About Chuck Jones, Brilliant Creator Of Road Runner And Wile E. Coyote

Most six-year-olds addicted to Saturday morning cartoons don’t know much about the man behind beloved characters like Wile E. Coyote and Roadrunner, or about the painstaking work that went into making Bugs Bunny chomp carrots and say “What’s Up, Doc?” For three decades, animation director and artist Charles Martin “Chuck” Jones was the mastermind behind these mania-filled classic cartoons. The Animation Art of Chuck Jones, a new exhibit at New York’s Museum of the Moving Image, celebrates his creative genius. It features 23 of the 300 animated films he directed, including How the Grinch Stole Christmas, as well as 125 original sketches, storyboards, animation cels, and photographs. Here, four things you probably didn’t know about Jones, who died in 2002:

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You’ve just survived a devastating earthquake. Time to take inventory: Flashlight? Check. First aid kit? Check. Bottle of wine and Scrabble. Chec—wait, what?
It’s casual, it’s approachable, and it’s downright lighthearted—which may lead you to ask, “How dare they?!?”
“People’s perception of a disaster is a Hollywood movie like Armageddon,” explains Kate Lydon, Ideo’s Public Sector Portfolio Director. Certainly, emergencies, like earthquakes, affect some people intensely. But for the broader population, “The actual experience is more like, ‘I BBQ’d all of the food in my freezer because it was melting, and I got to know my neighbors,’” Lydon says.
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You’ve just survived a devastating earthquake. Time to take inventory: Flashlight? Check. First aid kit? Check. Bottle of wine and Scrabble. Chec—wait, what?

It’s casual, it’s approachable, and it’s downright lighthearted—which may lead you to ask, “How dare they?!?”

“People’s perception of a disaster is a Hollywood movie like Armageddon,” explains Kate Lydon, Ideo’s Public Sector Portfolio Director. Certainly, emergencies, like earthquakes, affect some people intensely. But for the broader population, “The actual experience is more like, ‘I BBQ’d all of the food in my freezer because it was melting, and I got to know my neighbors,’” Lydon says.

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theskateographer:

Bought a “walking around” camera, for travel or those occasions when it may not be safe to pack the full kit (because I sometimes shoot in sketchy areas).

The Fujifilm X100s is a fixed lens APS-C camera that has some very interesting features that make it kind of an oddball. Built in ND filter and leaf shutter make for some interesting possibilities. It also has no optical low-pass filter, which makes for sharper images.

Used this camera, in conjunction with w a wireless radio trigger and a Canon 600-EX RT flash to shoot this photo of Alex D. blasting a nose-bone out of the flow bowl at Fremont Skatepark.

The tycoon wanted in connection to April’s South Korean ferry disaster spent millions to exhibit his photographs in lofty places.
The New York Times has a tremendous story about Yoo Byung-eun, the South Korean billionaire who disappeared shortly after a ferry owned and operated by one of his family’s companies sank, killing more than 300 people, many of them school children. As the Times reports, the 73-year-old tycoon led a bizarre, sordid life: he helmed a cultish religious movement that was linked to a mass suicide, and he spent four years in prison for siphoning church funding into his businesses. He also spent millions of dollars trying to style himself as a reclusive but brilliant photographer—a strategy that, incredibly, worked.
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The tycoon wanted in connection to April’s South Korean ferry disaster spent millions to exhibit his photographs in lofty places.

The New York Times has a tremendous story about Yoo Byung-eun, the South Korean billionaire who disappeared shortly after a ferry owned and operated by one of his family’s companies sank, killing more than 300 people, many of them school children. As the Times reports, the 73-year-old tycoon led a bizarre, sordid life: he helmed a cultish religious movement that was linked to a mass suicide, and he spent four years in prison for siphoning church funding into his businesses. He also spent millions of dollars trying to style himself as a reclusive but brilliant photographer—a strategy that, incredibly, worked.

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It’s tough to find time in a busy schedule for a full workout, but there’s a pretty easy opportunity for exercise that many of us pass up every day. That would be the decision to take stairs instead of an elevator. The flights would add up if we let them: up and down at the office, maybe once again for lunch, maybe yet again at our apartment building. But all too often, at the intersection of stand-or-step, we go with stand.
That’s not necessarily because we’re lazy. Truth is, the choice between taking the stairs or the elevator isn’t always created equal. While elevator banks are centrally located, staircases are often hidden away—not to mention poorly lit, dank, and let’s face it, somewhat murdery. As recent evidence shows, the design of a building can act as an invisible hand guiding us away from physical activity and toward a bigger pants size.
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It’s tough to find time in a busy schedule for a full workout, but there’s a pretty easy opportunity for exercise that many of us pass up every day. That would be the decision to take stairs instead of an elevator. The flights would add up if we let them: up and down at the office, maybe once again for lunch, maybe yet again at our apartment building. But all too often, at the intersection of stand-or-step, we go with stand.

That’s not necessarily because we’re lazy. Truth is, the choice between taking the stairs or the elevator isn’t always created equal. While elevator banks are centrally located, staircases are often hidden away—not to mention poorly lit, dank, and let’s face it, somewhat murdery. As recent evidence shows, the design of a building can act as an invisible hand guiding us away from physical activity and toward a bigger pants size.

Read More>